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Listen to Episode 125

Josh is joined by Ashay Prabhu, VP of Strategic Asset Management at Dude Solutions and co-founder of Assetic, to talk about strategic asset management and moving to long-term planning for budgeting for assets and infrastructure. 

Show Script:

Josh Peach  
Welcome to the Operate Intelligently Podcast, the podcast for all things operations.

Hello Operate Intelligently listeners. This is Joshua Peach, your host here and I am really excited for this episode because I think this will probably be the only time I think I feel like I'm talking in the future. Because I have with me today, Mr. Ashay Prabhu from Australia, one of our newest Dudes. Ashay, hello and how does Friday look?

Ashay Prabhu  
Hey, Josh. Friday looks pretty okay we are in the stage four of our lockdown, which is a fairly strict lockdown for COVID-19 and one of our earnest attempts at the moment to flatten the curve.

Josh Peach  
We're all in these different stages. And sorry to hear that, but glad you're doing well and that you're here to able to talk to us today about something that I'm really interested to learn more about, because I think I know just enough to be dangerous. And you are the expert at strategic asset management. So before we dig into that, tell us a little bit about you so that we, the listeners can know more of who you are, what you know, and where you been. And then we can talk about strategic asset management.

Ashay Prabhu  
Yeah, so my name is Ashay Prabhu. And thank you, Josh, for that kind introduction. I've been in this game personally for about 22 years, which is strategic asset management predominantly with government clients, facilities transport and in water and utilities. And the problem we solve for the last 21 years is is helping governments to have the tools and the technologies to spend their money better in order to get a significantly better outcome in the future, so you are spot on, we live in the future, we get out of bed, trying to predict the future for our clients. And it's really important for them to do that, in order to predict and spend the money in the best possible fashion. And in doing that, we we grew a market leading product in the Australia-New Zealand market for the last 15 years called Predictor, which is now acquired by Dude Solutions, which we are very, very pumped and excited about because it gives us, Joel and myself as founders of the business, it gave us that absolute leap frog into the North American market, which was our eventual dream. And now to be able to provide this technology and platform to 13,000 of our Dude customers now and and many many more in the government space in North America is quite an exciting next decade for us and that's just a little bit about myself. I've got an Indian background which makes me a cricket tragic. And everything in business for me is about how to play sport and bring cadence around how we do things.

Josh Peach  
Well I'm going to need to get down there at some point learn about cricket and make my first trip to Australia and I know who to I know who to look up.

Ashay Prabhu  
Very similar to baseball, but a great sport with like any sport has got so much analogy with predictive modeling and future cadence.

Josh Peach  
Are they playing anywhere right now because I'm looking for you know, other sports to look into. The last four months without hockey or basketball and baseball just starting up. I've been stuck watching cornhole tournaments.

Ashay Prabhu  
They're planning to start in September we'll see.

Josh Peach  
I'll have to find the channels that have that. You know, one of the things before we really kind of get into strategic asset management, one of the things that I think was really cool, was our initial talk. And I brought up how I've been in this industry for 25 plus years. And really on the reactive work, preventive maintenance side of things has been really my strong suit. And the tagline that's just been going around is do more with less, do more with less, do more with less, and your experience and what you're doing and what you do and what you're bringing to Dude nation. You just easily came out and said, Do your best with less or do best with less, which I've already coined. I've already got a speaking track and I've already submitted for speaking topics, but that's really what strategic asset management enables people to do, and especially with your solution. So tell us more about you know, what exactly is strategic asset management, more importantly, what is it that you provide? Or what what do we provide that is a strategic asset for clients?

Ashay Prabhu  
Yeah, so great question. So let's just get to the guts of it. And it honestly it's not rocket science. It's about the discipline of financial planning. And strategic asset management has always been around and linked with the term, which we are all aware of. And that term is infrastructure deficit, or infrastructure gap. And and let's hone in on that. Infrastructure deficit and infrastructure gap has been reported, and talked about by all Western economies, Canada, US, Australia, New Zealand, UK, South Africa, for decades, and that infrastructure deficit or infrastructure gap is reported in our annual report cards. The sad news is most western economies are somewhere Between a C plus and a D minus on an A to F scale, which is not great. And that's where that's where the problem exists. So infrastructure deficit occurs in really simple terms. It occurs when the rate at which our assets or our infrastructure, like our buildings, our facilities, our sidewalks, our pavements, our pipes, when the rate at which they get eaten up or get consumed, is far greater than our capacity to replace them. That's when we get to a point in our life cycle where we experience infrastructure deficit, which means we are not able to have enough money to pay for the rate at which they're getting consumed. Put in really simple terms, right? It's like running a family. You know two kids, they all go to school, everything going well, and at some point, the expenditure or the cost of running a smooth outcome is going to be overlaid by one of them wants to go into state to another university. There's international travel because the family wants to have holidays. There may be other desires about what type of car or what type of lifestyle to have. And it is quite likely at that point that the family might experience that there is a gap between what we desire and how much we can afford. And when that happens, something's gotta give. Something's got to give, which is typically in strategic asset management called how do we trade off between what we can deliver and yet achieve I balance in terms of outcome and budget, and what strategic asset management allows you to do. And Josh, thank you for coining that term or at least, you know, taking it out of my head through brainstorming. But doing best with less, is absolutely a beautiful way of putting together another word for optimization. And a lot of governments talk about optimization. Now, they talk about fixing the infrastructure gap by optimizing how we spend. But what we're really saying there is with the limited money we've got, how do we spend it in the best possible way? So, we will have the least number of read or or bad or poor condition bridges, how will we spend our money in the best possible way so we will have the least amount of poor condition roads or poor condition facilities in 5, 10, 20 years time, because we can see that infrastructure gaps slowly creeping. So strategic asset management is about solving that problem. First up articulating that gap, understanding that they're explaining it to the government, the politicians and the stakeholders that we do have an issue. But then saying, Hey, we know how to solve it, without necessarily spending more money. We know how to solve it by spending best what we've got now. And we know how to do it. So we end up reducing that gap, not constantly expecting it to increase because that's what we've got used to.

Josh Peach  
Yeah, and, you know, I think that this year, I mean, talk about timing that you know, you're joining us in 2020. And we're talking about this in 2020. And I think a lot of listeners are like, you know, that's great. Let's look of the state of the economy, look at what's going on in the world. Look at all this stuff. And the reality is, you know, when I think about it, there's no better time for someone to get going with strategic asset management than right now. And a great example, I think a great example that I could give is my local community was going to have a 1% increase in their budget this year. But because of COVID, and only because of COVID, there's now going to be a 5% decrease. Well,the needs didn't decrease the infrastructure, aging and everything else that goes along with it, Mark community didn't decrease. It was just the availability of funds and to be able to revise, retool and determine what that 5% gonna look like, what do we take that 5% from, and know that we're still giving the absolute best possible product, ie service quality, minimize catastrophic failure papers and things like that. There's no better time than really to get involved or to be thinking about something like this, not to get scared about it. But with saying that, how did people get here? Like  I see, D's and F's as far as our bridges in the United States, in certain states. They are almost the entire state has an Ds. Well, I don't want to drive over a bridge. How did how did communities and governments get to the D's and F's? Was it that they weren't paying attention to it? Was there a point in time where the gap was just so great that they couldn't tackle? Even if they had something they couldn't tackle everything? What's your best shot at that?

Ashay Prabhu  
Also, that is that has all got evidence and research behind it now. And it's a classic, classic human cadence issue. And if this is not about pointing fingers at anyone, or it's all about having the benefit of hindsight, yeah.The reality is that like humans, assets will age, infrastructure will age. There is there is there is absolutely no denying that fact. And as time passes, they will age and they will crumble. The the issue we've had is when we've had very healthy economies, and when we've had surplus monies and when we've been resource driven in the 60s and the 70s, and the 80s and the 90s, when a lot of this stuff was getting built. The only problems that we saw from an engineering perspective or from a political perspective, were the flashing reds that were about to collapse. What the human mind can't see without, without evidence data is the yellows and the dark oranges that are coming down the curve of that life cycle. It's a bit like a 40 to 50 year old human being, compared to an 80 year old human being. The 80 year old shows all signs of evidence depending on health, but the 40 to 50 you've really got to test to pick the ones that are likely to slide into the red. And when we've got enough money, like America did back in those days. The problem was easy to solve. When it breaks, we fix it. So instead of fixing when it was a $5 problem, we've been waiting until it gets to a $20 problem. And then $100 problem. And then with a budget of $1,000-a$100 problem, you can only do 10 bridges. Whereas if those bridges were arrested when they were, they were a $15 problem with $1,000 budget, we could have done 60 bridges. So it's a case again, of optimizing by saying do I have the data that tells me not just the reds that are out there, but also the yellows that are likely to turn rates, then I've got a far better chance of spending my money intelligently between the reds and the yellows, to get a much better outcome in the future. And we all love the bird that flew backwards because it had benefit of hindsight. And what predicted in a way is allow these infrastructure agencies to be like the bird that flew backwards, but it does that by going into the future now, then flying backwards to say what would happen if we did things differently, and then planning the future in the best possible way. It wasn't the case of it's suddenly happened. It's happened over time. It's natural. But it's because of lack of cadence in understanding that we don't need to just worry about the F's, we need to worry about the D's and the C's and stop them from becoming the E's and F's and we still have a monumental opportunity. Because whilst the report card says d minus an F plus that doesn't mean every breach and every pavement is at that point, what it means is 5, 6, 7 percent of our infrastructure is at that point, let's do something before it gets to about 20%.

Josh Peach  
In listening to you, I'd love to learn some of your some of your war stories, if you will. I'm sure that a large percentage of the people that you work with in your career were people that had, they weren't A's and B's, you know, a large percentage of the people that you work with aren't A's and B's and saying, hey, I want to stay doing well. There are people that have fires, they're people that have problems that are the C's, D's and F's. You must have, you know, some some, you run into the people that that get into that C, D and F and expect to be an A overnight or how do you baseline expectations of like, Hey, you didn't get here. It's kind of like my I'm a little bit on the heavy side. I'm not showing you the bottom part. But I'm a little bit on the heavy side. And I always tell people, I didn't get this big overnight, I ain't gonna get back to being small tomorrow either. So it's, you know, you have to be patient and realistic. How do you approach that and you know, do you do that right out of the gate or is it through ongoing with what does that look like?

Ashay Prabhu  
Yeah, it's it is an ongoing education. That's a really great question. And and it's it's a case of asset management practitioners have the evidence and the dashboards and the tools to show the politicians and the directors and the stakeholders, the boards of education, for example, that the future can be controlled. But the fundamental philosophy that needs to be entrenched is you can't just throw billions of dollars of this one off, and expect to make everyone back into a teenager. It's just not gonna happen overnight. It's like a human cycle, it will have to be reincarnated and only a certain proportion will die and only a certain proportion will be brand new. So that that philosophy has to be ingrained that infrastructure gap isn't a one off fix. It might be an injection of funds to do the urgent fixes, but then it's also about spending the money really wisely moving forward. So we have less and less in F and we end up arresting more and more of the C's and the B's turning into the D's. That's the fundamental key to strategic asset management. Communication is the key. Engaging politicians is the key. And it varies Josh, from geography to geography. Why did strategic asset management evolved in Australia? And why is Australia exporting this technology to the world? The simple answer is, when they started in Australia, we had 18 million people, one eight, we now have 25 million people with an infrastructure that is so widely spread, that with the taxes we get, there is no way on a per capita basis where we cannot afford to be efficient. So the reality is we were driven by need to really really do best with less because we had no other choice and to do that. We had to have tools and technologies and these optimization methods. And governments recognized that and brought regulation in to say, the government's, if you cannot demonstrate that you are optimizing, we will be not providing the funding that you are requiring or demanding. You've got to give us the evidence. Why do you need more money? Why do you need to spend so much on facilities so much on pavements? And that drove a behavior of cadence right, from the political to the practitioner level, which has now become a way of life. And that's why the success story is now being exported to other countries because we've done it, we've proven it. And what is really exciting getting out of bed every day is to hear a client saying we've saved $2 million this year, because we spending our money differently and getting a better.

Josh Peach  
You know, you and I talked about this podcast a couple of weeks ago and kind of did a framework and one of the parts was going to be, you know, for me to talk about why strategic asset management, I think you answered that through this description. And so I always like to give listeners a takeaway, something that they could walk away with right now put into an effort and kind of get going, whether it's with us or someone else. I always tell people, you know, if I do my job, if I do my job, right, the answer is going to be to come with the Dude, if I don't, I at least want to tell you to go with something that's going to make your life better. So let's go pass the why because you already gave it to us. And I'm glad that Australia got us started and we're on the right path and we get the right people in place. You know, let's put me as your potential client, someone you want to potentially work with. What should I be doing right now I have no strategic asset management plan. I have got no technology behind it. I've been throwing darts at the wall. I've been putting fires out. I got 100-year-old water pipes in town that are all breaking down and I'm out and I'm out fixing leaks all the time. What should I do? What are some steps that I should take now? Step back? How should I plan? What should I be looking for and evaluating? What are some important, you know, 1-2-3 that you would say if you were in my shoes? What would you be doing with the experience you have?

Ashay Prabhu  
Yeah, a lot of the agencies are already thinking and doing what you just asked Josh and to give yourself a persona. This actually hits at the heart of potentially the CFO, which is the chief financial officer, who's in charge of the next 10 years financial sustainability and the financial plan, probably even 20 years in many cases. And the CFO wants to know, do we have enough? Will we still be in business? What does the future look like? Or you could be the director of asset management planning and you're really interested in making sure that you have a handle on where the $20-$30 million of capital money that you get every year should be spent and cannot be spent better. Or you might be the community that expects that the pipes won't fail and the roads won't collapse. And that potable water will be delivered 24/7. So when you look from that persona perspective, anyone that is listening, whether you're a CFO, or whether you're the asset director, or whether you are community at the end of the day, you are custodians of billions of dollars of infrastructure that supports your everyday life. And any government agency, any government agency around the world, any government agency, whether it's train or transport, or local municipality or or a council, or education at the end of the day, you're delivering your services. 95% of those services require infrastructure. So you've got billions of dollars of infrastructure. So you have a vested interest in what does the next 10 years look like. And you have to have options for your long term business plan. And at the moment, if you have nothing, no tools, no evidence, no other business plan other than last year plus or minus 5%. If that's the only plan you've got, then the first thing you need is appetite to get out of bed and say, Hey, I'm going to do something about this. And believe me, I've been there for 20 years. If you have that appetite to say I'm going to do something about this. I have not come across one agency that does not have the data to do this. You've got the data. You've been using it, maybe using it adhawk. It could be in the heads of the people which will call walking databases that work on your assets. It could be in five or six spreadsheets floating around somewhere. But you cannot even convince yourself that you have been spending 10s of millions of dollars every year on your infrastructure, without any absolute knowledge about your infrastructure. That is just impossible. So, first thing is appetite. And the second thing is saying, I'm going to keep this really simple. I'm not going to complicate this. I'm going to keep this really simple with the data that I've got, and embark on this journey. And call it generation one, because generation one is going to give me at least four, if not 40 options for the future, to engage with my board, to engage with my community, to engage with my counselors, my politicians, my other departments, to get on this journey of solving a problem that many others are salty. So two things: appetite and keeping it really, really simple when you start.

Josh Peach  
Yeah. And I would add, obviously communication and understanding that the plan is going to change, which a lot of stakeholders, and we can put this to taxpayers in the United States and Australia. You know, hey, you told me that we're going to have these needs for the next 10 years and your strategic or capital plan. Now, you come a year later, and we've got all these different needs. What does that mean? And I think it's educating and communicating the reality of what we say today is not more likely than not, it is going to change and it's going to be revision to about 100 different times. And I always I reference a book a lot it's called Flawless Execution by Afterburner Inc. And it talks about Air Force pilots, how the mission is set, set to go one way and how they how they execute flawlessly and it makes it look like it was just textbook. But there were about 100 different changes and scenarios that took place in that, for it to come out flawlessly. And I think that's one of the challenges that, in a lot of communities that I work with anyway, is that challenges of getting people to understand that what we say we need today is going to be different tomorrow and we might need to reprioritize, right, what that best with less looks like.

Ashay Prabhu  
It's got a lot of bonded now with Institute of Asset Management, the Institute of Public Works Engineering, and the International Infrastructure Management manual has got a lot of case studies and proof points, for example, most long life infrastructure that's thought alive for 50 to 100 years like the buildings, the pavements, the bridges, the dams, the pipes, etc. You would expect the plan to be revised every four years, which is technically 100 divided by 25. That's the rule of thumb. Every four years, you would revise it, because you've now got better data about how it's degrading. But absolutely, next 12 months, they could be an unforeseen event that forces the financial plan to be diverted. But you are diverting it with full knowledge of the impact on the future. And the ability to raise your hand when there is stimulus funding to say, hey, I've got strategic asset management, I've been in control. And if I get this stimulus money, I can show you how I'm going to spend it in the best fashion, as opposed to someone here who says I've got no strategic asset management. And last year plus or minus 5%. I spent it adhawk. But hey, I also want your stimulus money. Right now who's got the best story in the room? The one who's got strategic asset management cadence, nine out of 10 times is going to get the funding.

Josh Peach  
Yeah, and that's that's becoming a mandate and a requirement in many states, especially with school buildings. I know school building authorities that provide some to a lot of the funding. You know, they're required when you submit for funding, that you have a plan that's in place for the building that you might want to replace, that you have that strategic plan already there and a preventive maintenance plan to show that you're doing best efforts to keep everything for its anticipated lifecycle based on the work you're supposed to do.

Ashay Prabhu  
And the best story in the room is one that provides not one option for the future, but four options. And to me, I always say to politicians, I say it's like you're sitting in a helicopter flying at 1,000 feet, and you can see your assets, and you do one whole round of your city. And then you come back. And this time you change some levers in the helicopter and say I'm going to give a little bit more funding to the west side. And I'm going to take away a little bit of funding from these assets here. And I'm going to shift the service level for the community over here because they have more need. And then you fly the helicopter again and see what the future looks like. And you do that five or six times. And it shows you your future city now, to determine where do I want to live in five years or 10 years, which version of the city I want to live in five years or 10 years. And on cloud computing, with the power of the cloud, we can do that now with infinite speed to give these decision makers the ability to make decisions on the basis of a future option. And not just one option, but 5, 10, 12 options to make the best way to spend the money.

Josh Peach  
That hits me with an interesting question for you. You've been in this business for 22 years, you've obviously got a ton of people that you have helped and made an impact on. You've got to have one or two, I mean, all of them have got to have a good feeling for you. But there's got to be one or two that you walked away from that it was just like, man, what a difference. What a difference our work made or what an impact or what a difference, you know, we mind sharing one or two those you can get as deep as far as who they are as vague as you want. But just kind of the example of what you guys did and how it made a difference.

Ashay Prabhu  
We're really, really passionate about that. I'll give you two stretches of timeline. So 1998 were our first two clients in Victoria. And the reason they were our first clients is because they only have about 10,000 ratepayers each. And when you've only got 10,000 ratepayers and over a billion dollars worth of assets because they're so far spread out, and a billion dollars getting consumed at about 20 million a year. And you've only got 10 million to spend every year, you've got a gap of 10 million straightaway to start with. What is really, really proud and privileged for us in 1998, they came on board as our first two clients, and they are still with us, pushing every boundary of technology and data. And to this day, they are saving millions by simply spending their money differently, constantly saving money by doing better every five years in terms of strategic asset management. And this is a classic example of a really small community with basic data demonstrating to the government in many cases why they should get roads to recovery funding, or why they should be allowed to raise their rates above the right cap. And now I fast forward and I come back to 2020. And let's just pick a couple of our most recent clients. The Department of Education, which has 72 schools in the state of Tasmania in fairly dilapidated condition around about a D plus. And they have now been able to, in the space of 12 months, not just articulate the size of the problem to the government. But they have been very successful using strategic asset management, to lobby $110 million of stimulus funding, in addition to their normal funding, to target the areas that need to be targeted, in order to reduce the infrastructure gap that would have got to unsurmountable levels in the next 10 years. And the only reason they've got that funding is because they were able to demonstrate the future now and have a convincing decision-making conversation with the politicians, they are a classic brand new case study. You look at Rancho water in California, where they have utilized predictive strategic asset management. And this is not kudos to us, right. This is kudos to the clients, we are simply providing a platform where they can make these decisions. The real heavy lifting is done by the clients. And Rancho water, for example, is saving about $7 million a year now, because they have shifted successfully from their traditional strategy of how they spend their money to this optimized, do best with less and they were able to convince the board that that was a sensible approach because they had the models to prove it. The other classic example that is an absolutely eye opening story for all of us, including Australia, is the Topeka City in Kansas. What a great case study where they were able to demonstrate to the government that the half cent tax that was going to be taken away from them should be retained. And the way they did that was by demonstrating that the $2 million a year that they have on their streets, using Predictor they were able to show how they could spend that money differently and get a significantly better outcome. And therefore the tax should be retained because if the tax wasn't retained, then there were chances of having more than 7-8% of their streets in very poor condition, compared to only one or 2%. And without demonstrating, you don't have a story. You don't have a business case. You don't have a business plan. And you're really not in control of the future. And no human being doesn't want to be in control of the future. So these clients, they are absolutely brilliant case studies of self sufficiency, working with the least amount of data to start with going on this journey year after year to get into a really financially sustainable position, attracting maximum stimulus funding, attracting maximum recovery funding and demonstrating their business case for the future. So we are really privileged that our first client, first two clients are still with us, and still on that journey. And we're really excited that the modern clients who've now got a lot of data by the way, the modern clients, and they've got a much better opportunity to do it a lot quicker than they did 20 years ago. But they're all great, great examples of really thought leader organizations that do best with less.

Josh Peach  
I tell you I'm glad I took a beeline with this and adjusted what we're doing. Because that is fantastic to hear about the first clients. And I don't think I told you this. But recently I did a talk with the school side, education side, which is where we started at Dude with SchoolDude. And we had our first education client sign on for our work order system on July 1 of 2001. And the following five months to close out the year, we had 44 more so we had 45 clients that purchased our work order solution in our first year, and all 45 of those are getting their 20th anniversary renewal notice meaning we've kept 100% of our clients have from our first year of business of selling our CMMS software. And it's what's amazing is our new partners that have come on board, I did the last podcast with some some of our team from TheWorxHub, which was our acquisition in Canada that's primarily healthcare and they were saying, you know, a lot of our first clients are all still here with us. That's really an amazing alignment with people  that are passionate that care that are loyal, and that have that loyalty served back to them by their by their clients. And that's fantastic. The other piece that I can't say enough to is everyone has a story. It's how you tell it and share it is what you end up getting at the end of the day. And everybody's got a great story. I mean, when you talk about the work that the people that we get to serve every day, when you talk about the infrastructure that they've many inherited, that are C- to F rating, and they still show up to work every day and grind it out and do the best job that they possibly can. And we can help them with that story to get them to that next level. That's amazing. So making sure that you guys become the best storytellers you can be with with some with the technology and tools that are out there to help you with it is definitely what folks if you're not doing it, if you're doing that 5% next year figuring it out and taking a gander every once in a while, you really need to start working on your storytelling and we can help you with that.

Ashay Prabhu  
You hit the nail on the head. And I repeat, just because infrastructure report card for, say water, or for facilities in the United States says D-, that doesn't mean every water pipe in every facility is a D-. You've got some in a some in B, majority in C, and there are a few in E and F. Right? And when you look at that histogram, where there is still some in A, B, and C, the trick for the future is how do we arrest those B's becoming C's and the C's becoming D's? As opposed to getting a brain clog with the fact that we've got a D- report. It's about how do we lift the average up and do best with less by optimizing. And that part is done by the strategic asset management software because it does those millions of permutations and combinations to produce the best result and the best future option. But there is a massive, massive opportunity in United States to take this infrastructure report card from a D minus to potentially a B plus, without a lot of extra money. And the best story will win the money. And it's an opportunity to really lift the game. 

Josh Peach  
Yeah, I have to tell you, this has been great. I've learned a lot from our previous planning call and just following along with you over the last couple of months. Welcome. I'm glad Friday looks good for me based on where you're at for Friday. I'm going to look forward to my tomorrow. This is Thursday at 5pm here in Boston, Massachusetts. So really appreciate you given the time here and given some education, I think we could probably do a six part series on this and have plenty leftover to talk about. But thank you very much, sir. Appreciate it. And I look forward to learning more from you.

Ashay Prabhu  
Thank you, Josh. Really appreciate it. I quite enjoyed this. And I hope it's useful and we're really, really privileged and pumped to be part of the United States journey. This is terrific.

Josh Peach  
We got a lot of fun to have here and helping folks so looking forward to it. Thank you. And and that will wrap this episode of the Operate Intelligently Podcast. It is Thursday here in the United States. It's Friday in Australia. It's the first week in August. We've got a lot of our clients are out there right now scrambling running around trying to get schools ready for any number of options for the reopening hybrid, remote, fully occupied. We've got communities that are challenged. We've got Ashay in Australia, that's basically back to a lockdown situation, hang in there, keep doing what you're doing. We've weathered the storm this long, we can get through this just keep staying safe and doing the best that you possibly can. And we've got the other side to look forward to. So that'll do it for us here at the Operate Intelligently Podcast. Thank you. Thanks for listening to the Operate Intelligently Podcast produced by Dude Solutions. You can reach us by emailing dspodcast@dudesolutions.com or check us out on the web at dudesolutions.com

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

 

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