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Listen to Episode 112

Josh does his first social distancing podcast with Ken Wertz, Executive Director of MFAA (Massachusetts Facilities Administrators Association), and Dr. John Marcus, Superintendent of Stoughton Public Schools. They talk about cleaning and communication best practices, meals for students, and other protocols around the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Show Notes:

Show Script:

Josh Peach  
Welcome to the Operate Intelligently Podcast, the podcast for all things operations.

Hello Operate Intelligently listeners. This is a first for me, Joshua Peach, your host. I am sitting in a Target parking lot looking at two longtime friends of mine who are also in the education field. Looking at Ken Wertz, giving me the thumbs up. Ken is the Massachusetts Facilities Administrators Association Executive Director. He helps all school districts in the state of Massachusetts, everything operations related. And next to him in his car is Dr. John Marcus, the superintendent of schools from Stoughton Public Schools in Stoughton, Massachusetts. And really glad to have both you guys on here. This is kind of funny. We're sitting, we're gonna put some pictures on social media, but there's three cars, socially distant enough with our windows up, and dialed into a ZOOM recording to do this podcast. We wanted to do something fun. I always like to look at folks when I'm talking to them, so welcome guys. Thanks for sitting in your cars for a few. You guys are here.

Ken Wertz  
Thanks for having us, Josh.

John Marcus  
Thanks, Josh. This is awesome.

Ken Wertz  
This Josh and so many other reasons why I love you so much. Whenever either of us have a stupid idea, the other one's like, yep, we should do that. Right? Why have a conference call in our own houses separated by 15 miles when we can just sit and look at each other on a conference call?

Josh Peach  
Well, you know, and there's this thing called video on ZOOM and we bypass that and we're just sitting in our cars. So this is cool. 

Ken Wertz  
Quite honestly, it makes me feel better.

John Marcus  
Sometimes listening to the sultry sounds of you and Kenny is really all that people need. They don't need the visual. They just need that smooth, soft voice of Joshua Peach singing to us nightly, it's like David Allen Boucher.

Ken Wertz  
It is like David Allen Boucher, nighttime magic Joshua Peach.

Josh Peach  
Well, you know I called you guys and asked you for a favor around coronavirus. First thing I want to talk about schools are closed, the cleaning processes and what people are doing, staffing levels, everything is all over the board. Can, you know, what are you seeing out there from your members and from schools? Is there any standardized processes that are in place? Any best practices?

Ken Wertz  
So in Massachusetts, all the schools are closed. As far as cleaning, there's really no guidance or no straight direction as to what is the current best practice as far as staffing. We have a message board for our members on MFAA. And the question was, you know, put out there, what are people doing? And the problem we had is it's not really a problem, because this thing is so fluid and changes day to day. Some districts are keeping their cleaners in and they're cleaning and disinfecting. Other districts are sending their people home and saying, when school opens up, we're going to bring our teams back in a week before and clean and disinfect again. So it's kind of a mixed bag right now, the big thing that we're pushing and the message we're trying to tell people is just like healthcare--sanitizing in, sanitize out, you wash your hands before you go to work. You wash your hands before you touch your face. You wash your hands before you eat lunch. You wash your hands on the way home. Sanitize, sanitize and clean before you disinfect. Because there's a lot of misinformation out there. About cross contamination or not misinformation, just lack of information. You know, I try to give people examples like I was at my barber, right before everyone was quarantined out, and I was trying to educate her on cross contamination. I said, 'All right, so you know, the brush that you wipe off the back of people's necks with? Well, that's connecting everyone with each other. So use your hairdryer to blow off the hair and tell them sorry. It's like, what do I do about beards? I'm like, you shouldn't do shaves. You shouldn't do beards. It's too this. It's too that. But while you're working and cutting someone's hair, you don't pick up the phone, and then go back to cutting your hair. Because while you're washing your hands, you're not disinfecting your phone. Right. So now, you answering that phone has given me cross contamination from the persons whose hair you were cutting before me. And it's simple little things like that. So in your schools, it's touchpoints. It's hardware, it's light switches. And John can talk more about it because you know, from the data end of things, keyboards, that's the big thing now and mice and all that kind of stuff. There have been some creative solutions. Paul Anastasie's currently working with the Northbridge schools. And the team there decided to go golf course on their Elementary School Athletic Department. And they created this giant ball washer, where they would take all the kick balls, all the balls that never ever, ever get washed, and they dumped them in a cleaning, neutral cleaning and disinfecting solution. And then they cleaned every kickball and every play ball that they're using in the elementary schools. Very creative. But it's things like that, that we tend to forget about. But even if we forgot about those, the current virus from what I've read, and what I've researched, can only live on a surface for up to 72 hours. So if we close the buildings for 2, 3, 4 weeks, the virus that's in the building will be dead. The problem is the first person that comes in that doesn't know that they have the virus and they touch something, the buildings recontaminated. That's where it gets really tricky. You can clean and scrub and deep clean and disinfect as much as you want. The minute we unload the buses, there's kids coming in the buildings, teachers coming in the buildings that are bringing their own stuff with them. So you have to be cautious about that.

John Marcus  
I think to that point, we made a decision to basically clean and disinfect everything and then shut all the buildings down. So we're kind of doing that now recognizing that, you know, when we reopen, we're reopening back to humans again, and we humans carry germs. But in the meantime, in order to sort of be 100% sure that we've covered everything, we have our crews going through and doing deep cleaning, electrostatic cleaning all that in all the buildings and once the areas are done, classroom is done or an areas done, we're tagging it and saying this area's done and is now closed off. So our essential employees who are coming in, our kitchen workers, some of our administrators when they come in, they're not allowed to go into any of those areas because we know that they've already been taken care of. So that's been our plan. And I think the question really then becomes, once we get all of that done, and it's not going to take us more than a couple of weeks, then where do we go from there? You know, do we have the custodians keep coming in? You know, a lot of places have basically said to their administrators and secretaries, you need to stop coming in. And we've slowly scaled back day after day, to the point where we have just a bare skeleton crew of people coming in, but there's gonna come a point where we don't have anybody coming in.

Ken Wertz  
Just in, it's funny that I just had a conversation with Lynn Shara, from Maya. Maya's the insurance carrier for over 550 municipality, you know, town halls, police stations, fire stations schools in Massachusetts. And their guidance right now is run a skeleton crew but still have people coming in to do spot checks on your buildings. Because what we're seeing, they just had a major loss out in Western Massachusetts where a valve for a water main let go on a third floor, flooded out the entire second, first floor, millions of dollars worth of damage. It wasn't that the building froze up. It's just that it just happened that there was a mechanical failure. So those are the things that we have to, as this thing continues to progress, we still need to make sure we're checking our buildings. We're walking through, do you have a dedicated person? Do they know what they're looking for? Are you, you know, the doors that you marked closed, John, are they still peeking in there to see if there was a freeze up, if there was something. Hopefully winters done, so freeze up should be going away. But the other thing to remember because we don't know how long this is going, our new buildings are super, super tight. And Josh, you know, we're talking to everyone across the country here. Humidity is a major, major issue. So if you're going to go in and shut down your buildings and try and save energy and shut down heating systems and shut everything off in the world, you're going to create a moisture issue in your building, then you'll be combating, you know, Coronavirus and mold. So we have to be cautious about what we're scaling back, what we're shutting off, and what we think might be the best intentions to try and save energy while the building's not occupied. So we should just shut everything off. That seems to make sense at first, until you start peeling back the layers a little bit and in the new highly sophisticated buildings, you need air exchange. You know, for the states that are in air conditioning weather you know, if you're down in Georgia, facilities directors down there know we can't shut the AC off. It'll be a swamp inside. You can scale it back, but you have to hit that tipping point where you adjust it based off the humidity inside. There's a lot of discussions and as this moves, you know, right here in New England right now, we're in that weird spring month time where it's, you know, it's nice enough that we could shut the heat off, but is that really the best practice?

Josh Peach  
Yeah. And on that when we talk about occupancy and one of the things that is, I think overlooked by a lot of folks today is, you know, the schools are closed for the foreseeable future. Let's just say it's 2, 3, 4 or five weeks. One of the things that's often overlooked, but I think every single school district has to do this right now is provide free and reduced meals for kids that can't eat otherwise, basically. John, I heard you're doing a fantastic job with regard to that and your team's really stepped up and doing some phenomenal things to make sure that no one goes home hungry in Stoughton. How hard was that to implement? How quick did you implement it? And then how does that all fall into the fold in the management of the buildings again, like you said, you close all the buildings, so you know, are you making the meals in one kitchen in the district and how did you choose that kind of? What's your best practice on that? Because I've heard great things.

John Marcus  
That's a great question. I think we, to answer the first part, we began immediately. We're a district, we have about 40% Free and Reduced income families. And because of that, we have a summer feeding program that actually works through the USDA, and allows us to feed any child who lives in Stoughton. We were given permission or given guidance, that the Summer Feeding Program concept is where we're going to go and therefore, that immediately took out some of those kind of difficult restrictions to get around in terms of who we're feeding and how we're doing it. So we right away got all the food stuff that we had ready for last week, for this week in place and had kitchen workers coming in if they were comfortable and they felt okay, using social distancing, we had people at stations that were more than six feet apart, they were sort of putting stuff together and bagging everything up. And then we were going out and setting everything up outside of buildings. And people were driving up in cars. And we, you know, just asked how many kids they had and then dropped bags of lunches and breakfasts and milks into the passenger side and stepped away. So we've continued to sort of modify that as we've gone along to keep the distancing that much better. But we also know that starting next week, we're going to see an uptick in the amount of people we're serving. So the first day, we probably served about 200 kids. It stayed steady until today, Friday, when we jump up to about 400. And we're expecting that come Monday, Tuesday as the time goes on that we're going to be up into the 5, 6, 7 hundred range. And so we're trying to not only scale up our production, but also minimize our staff needed in order to be able to do that. So where everybody is amazing, and wants to help, and we had, you know, the first few days, we probably had 15 or 20 people at our different sites, and enthusiastic and all that helping everybody out. We've now realized that we can do it with far fewer people and have scaled that back to about six people total in one site, and then deliveries that are going to be launched from that one site out to neighborhoods.

Josh Peach  
And how do you know you know, you said you started this week at 200. Did you anticipate four or 500? Or do people have to, you know, call in ahead of time, like how does that all work?

John Marcus  
That's a great question. We anticipated exactly what you said, we anticipated around four or 500. And were surprised that we didn't get that many the first couple days. So we set up and we were ready to go for that many. Most of the things that we were putting out there, you know, peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, ham sandwiches, things like that, were all refrigerated were easy to, you know, to keep for the next day. But knowing what we had done that first day and how many we had, we scaled back on the second day and started making fewer sandwiches. Caught us today a little bit having to scramble but we've also worked with vendors who are doing pre-packaged or pre-made sandwiches. And so those are coming in frozen. And it's easy to then just send them home with kids either frozen or thawed, you know, but not as many as we would have thought earlier. So we're ready to go with that, in that scenario.

Josh Peach  
Wow. And that key point that you said was that which was one of my questions, which was, I mean, you're doing a stop and drop putting the stuff outside. So again, there's no contamination coming in. Limited, limited to no interaction socially with anybody that's working on the front lines, making the food or cleaning the buildings and the people that are coming to pick up the food, which I think is key. Because I have seen and heard a couple of folks that said that the parents are actually going inside the buildings, which is you know, it's just adding the amount of work that you guys need to do and it also compromises the space. And you know, when somebody walks into a building, it's hard, doesn't matter how many cameras you have. It's really hard to track and see all the different places that they could touch, sneeze, cough, or put something. So it's just an added challenge. So your buildings are are locked down other than, you know that staff and faculty and they just come outside you have a table set up or something?

John Marcus  
Yeah, we've got a, it's basically like a giant McDonald's pickup line. We've got it in front of our middle school. So we've got probably about 1000 foot long driveway so we can have cars queue up, and we've got about right now we've got two but I think we'll be up to about four tents, four 10 by 10 tents set up along that pathway. And basically people pull up, we've got everything set in either sets of four sets of two. So we just start calling out to the window how many kids? They tell us four, family of five or whatever it is, we just, you know, hand them bags of sets of four, sets of two plus any produce that we have. So we've been handing out tons of bananas and apples and lettuce. Anything we have in the fridge. And it's just grab and go, as you say. The next adventure is really going to be supporting those families who can't get to us. And how do we get to them in neighborhoods where we know there's a higher level of need? Do we have sort of drop off points and things like that. And we've been wrestling with that quite a bit. You know, we have buses who are contracted for the full school year. So we've got drivers and buses ready to go. And we were all set with that concept, until we realized that we're going to have a bus go into a parking lot or a neighborhood. And, you know, here the lunch people show up and we're going to have a congregation of 20, 30,  40 people waiting for the lunches and so we had to kind of put that whole idea on hold and come up with something that is a little more small scale and relies on neighbors helping neighbors, you know, sort of reaching out and saying, you know, what couple of families can you connect to so more of like a spiderweb, or a tree chart than a single point of drop where lots of people are coming?

Ken Wertz  
Yeah, interesting that I've heard some communities what they're doing. The maintenance crew is actually driving their maintenance trucks, with pre-packaged food in the back to these like an apartment development, where you know, there's a large catchment of kids who are free and reduced, and they'll set up times like, 'Alright, 10 o'clock, we're going to be at the corner, we're going to put out you know, 50 bags of food, people come and grab your bags of food.' So I've seen some people leveraging their maintenance department with their pickup trucks, to make those little local things and establishing a timeframe and telling people keep your social distancing. Do your thing, but we're going to have food here at 10 o'clock from 10 to 10:15, the truck is going to be here and then from 11 to 11:15 it's going to be at another site and they've done a pretty good job of scheduling it. I know the maintenance teams are running a little bit ragged with at all. It's a lot to ask and a lot to do. But they're willing for the challenge. So as long as they can stay healthy, you know, that seems to be a successful option that people have looked at, you know, taking advantage of the people that are going to be in your buildings anyway, those vertical staff, and kind of balancing it that way.

Josh Peach  
You actually helped me with my next kind of question or discussion topic, which is, when all this stuff happened, I have to claim I don't know if it's ignorance or what it was. But when all this stuff happened, and the governor closed all the schools in Massachusetts and says, 'Hey, we're doing mandatory closings until whatever the date was', my immediate brain went to wow, think about all the PM work that these  maintenance and operations guys are going to be able to think about all of the projects that typically get done in the summer and that stuck with me for probably a good 24-48 hours. And then afterwards, I realized that they're not able to get that work done. They're not allowed that you know that in many cases, they're not allowing vendors that do that work into the buildings. What are you seeing and what are you hearing about that?

Ken Wertz  
Well, I mean, look at right now, you know, Mayor, the mayor of Boston, shut down all construction projects in Boston. So everyone that's working out of the Boston local, you know, all the carpenters, all the trades people, they're not working because you can't accomplish the job by still maintaining that social distancing.

John Marcus  
I think Josh you made a really good point about the timing of all this and the fact that whenever that was, it wasn't even a week ago, that we were all like, I mean, I had the exact same thought, you know, Oh, all right. Well, we can't have all these kids in, we have to have social distancing. But we can have the elevator guy come in, or we can have the, you know, the work that we were going to do on that particular room or office happen. And then you start to realize that: A. We've sealed off those rooms, B. the governor is coming in or whoever the different representatives are saying, nope, you can't do that, you can't do that. And so every day for me, I feel like as a superintendent, we think we have, we know what we're doing. We have the plan, and then it ratchets up another step and you have to say, nope, can't do that, scale it back. And that's gone for everything from our kids and how they're coming to school, to maintenance of the buildings, to our food service, every day something changes or ratchets up a little bit that we have to shift our whole way of thinking and the amount of that that's been going on for the last couple of weeks is, I think for me as an educational leader, the most unnerving that we feel like we've got it, we've made a good decision. I've worked with my teams of administrators or facility director or whoever they are, come up with a great plan, and then honestly stand up from that meeting, you know, with the kind of football like, okay, break, here we go, and then five seconds later, it's like, whoops, nope, nope, that's not gonna happen. So, it's been that's I think the biggest challenge for a lot of us right now is the constant shifting of the playing field and how to keep maneuvering in a space that keeps changing on us.

Ken Wertz  
And it's how to deal with the information that you're provided with, which makes those decisions you know, you're doing the best you can with the information you're provided at that time. And there's so much misinformation out there right now as well that you really have to be cautious. So I know that you know MEMA, the Massachusetts Emergency Management Association and the governor are having conference calls, governor just had a, you know, his daily update with what's going on with CO-VID. It's really hard to keep your finger on the pulse because it changes so damn fast. Like John said, a couple weeks ago, you know, we were at a we MFAA had a meeting, we had 50 people. It was before all this stuff happens. And I'm like, should we be doing this? What's going on here? As I was doing a panel presentation, on coronavirus, the governor made a declaration that all schools would be closed and you can't have meetings of over 100 people. During the meeting I was in. We thought that we were doing the right thing trying to teach people about you know, coronavirus, teach people about cross contamination, do all that stuff. Real Time comes on the TV that you know the governor says no more meetings of this size. Oh, great. Well, there you go. So we've just endangered 200 people at this event.

Josh Peach  
I mean, it happened so fast. I mean I went to Maryland, last Wednesday, and I spoke to a school district's Evernote staff for in the morning and got on the plane and by time I touchdown North Carolina, I got word that the governor there closed every school in Maryland for a couple of weeks. And then that night, Wednesday night, we had the president came on and said, hey, there's no flying in, you know, Europe and effective Friday. And then by the time we got home Thursday night, everything was shut down, restaurants and bars and everything else. It's just been like you say every day it's a new adventure. You know, what do you guys you know, John, like I said, you know, you're the next town over you live in, the town that we live in together here in Easton. How did you do? Like, how did you make everything either seem smooth? Or how did you, you know, where did you go? Were there any places that you went that helped guide you? Is this just a, you know, just came naturally to you like, what's the secret sauce with with how everything's gone for you?

John Marcus  
I think one of the funniest phrases that I've heard way back in the early days of this whole thing was the Commissioner of Education. When folks were asking questions about how are we going to make this work? And this is like before we even talking about closures. This was you know, I don't even know what the world was like then but in the early days, how are we going to make this work? And the commissioner said, Well, I trust that you all can use your Superintendent magic. So there it is. I have a wand and some sprinkle dust and I'm using Superintendent magic. Now seriously, I am incredibly fortunate and incredibly grateful for the team of people around me. First, in my own district. I've got just unbelievably dedicated, very smart, very caring folks. So, our close close team, the director of facilities, and the director of nursing, my assistant superintendent and I have been meeting every single day. And as things change, you know, that core team is the one that gives advice on do this, try this, you know, whatever. They're in touch with other facilities directors and and the association, the Department of Public Health and our Mass. partners and all that so they keep bringing back information. As things adjust, that core group has been talking nonstop. Then as things got more tricky, superintendents started reaching out to each other. And so we've had, we have a South Shore Superintendent's Association group, and then a smaller group of those folks who talk to each other about snow days. Those groups have been meeting almost every day and giving advice on some of the trickier subjects such as special education, how do we pay people? How do we deal with continuity of learning experiences? So there's been a ton of conversation back and forth among superintendent groups locally, some statewide but the local groups have been absolutely incredible. And a lot of that is listening to folks, you know, I'm new. So I'm listening to the veterans and hearing their advice. And what they've done with other difficult situations in the past, and we're learning from each other and trying to stick together with best practice as much as we can. That in Massachusetts is a little tricky because we are 351 little fiefdoms. You know, in a state our size, when you look nationally, people look at our state as this little mini-sized state, but we've got 351 cities and towns and they all work independent of each other. So each school committee school district is making their own decisions. There's not county or regional kinds of things. So it's absolutely critical that we're on the phone with each other and on these zoom calls, and go to meeting calls all the time to check in with each other and make sure we're on the same page.

Ken Wertz  
Yeah, and you're also, you know, John's, to, you know, to his credit, he's also an amazing communicator, and I think that's helped him in that community immensely. Just sending out a message, and even the message you sending out to people is kind of uplifting and fun. You don't have to always send the gloom and doom, you know, you have to send a message, you have to have some good communication. But use social media to have a little fun with that, because everyone could use a little uplift in this time. We're all freaking out. And anxiety is at an all time high. So John's teams really good about getting the information out, but also getting it out in a way that's going to make people feel, yeah, we've got this. Our leader's got this under control, we're gonna roll with it.

Josh Peach  
The sun's gonna come up to the east tomorrow. The two takeaways that I got from a leadership perspective was when we're talking about communicating, he said something a couple of times, which is listening. You know, as leaders, we have to do a lot more listening than talking in these times. Then the second thing that I caught, you made a reference to you being new. And I think what every leader in any capacity that's dealing with this right now, is we're all new. None of us have gone through a coronavirus experience. So this is uncharted waters. So what worked in y2k or 9/11 or MERS, SARS, Ebola, swine, bird flu, any of those things, this is completely a different world, you know, unprecedented. And we all have to kind of look at that with a pair of new glasses as opposed to being, you know, the experienced person that knows it all. You know, Kenny, you got any parting thoughts or ideas or suggestions? How could people and furthermore, I know that you're focused on Massachusetts, I know you're talking to people all around the country. You know, I know that you've got a very active listserv with your members, one of the most active listservs that I've ever heard about. I always hear you hear our clients talk about how they're putting questions out there and everything else. You know, what do you suggest people in just in facilities in general should be, who should they be reaching out to? How could they reach out to you and any parting thoughts here?

Ken Wertz  
Well, I mean, just like any good leader? I mean, listening is a huge piece like you mentioned. I was just on a phone call with Keith Gourlay, yesterday, who's the Executive Director for New Jersey School Buildings Grounds because I want to compare notes with him. You know, I'm going to call up to New Hampshire, find out what they're doing. Get a good benchmark of what everyone around here is doing to figure out how we're doing it right. How we are not. The biggest learning lesson that I've taken from this event, which we've all known, especially in facilities departments, we continue to underfund facilities and operations. So right now, everyone's using electrostatic disinfectant sprayers. And for folks that don't know what they are, it's a small little handheld or it's a backpack thing that you can put a disinfectant product in, it puts an electric charge into the disinfectant and when you spray it, it completely wraps around whatever you're spraying it on. So if you're spraying it onto a door handle, it covers all sides of the door handle, you know, so it's about you know, 700 to 1,500 dollars per unit. Two years ago, these came to the market and I know hundreds of facilities directors that went to the business managers and said, Hey, here's this new tool, it's going to help us reduce the flu, it's going to help us do this, do that. I'd really like to buy a dozen of them to spread them out in our district. And what was the response? We can't afford it. We can't afford it. Oh, we have to cut back we can't afford it. Well, now you know, flash forward two years, you can't even buy them. So if you don't have them in your district, you're dead in the water until potentially May or June. So you're disinfecting is all by hand now. So you've taken these tools that are going to help keep these buildings healthy, and we continue to cut and shop our facilities department because it seems to be the sacrificial lamb. So if nothing else during this whole horrible, horrible process we're all living through. It should hopefully bring us back to reflect on how are we budgeting maintenance, how are we budgeting cleaning, are we cleaning our buildings appropriately? You know, how can we hopefully stave off some of this stuff from happening in the future? What can we do planning now, to prepare for the next one? Because it's going to come, we know what's going to come. We have the H1N1, we had the SARS, we had this, we had the that, this is the new one. This one's horrible. It's really bad. We're going to have another one. After this dust settles, there's going to be another one. So how do we take this as a learning lesson to be prepared better next time around. And that's what I'm seeing in every state, where I talk with folks is that the underfunding of our custodial services, of our cleaning services, of our equipment and our maintenance of our buildings, is really showing how our funding strategy is broken for public buildings.

Josh Peach  
Yeah, that's one of those things that I always, you know, kind of try to get people to realize that they need to benchmark and they need to capture what they're doing, because a lot of the stuff that's going on right now, they're not doing that. They're just it's a knee jerk. We're doing all the work and then we get past all of this. And you're sitting in a room and people forget how much work was needed, how much time was needed, how many people were needed, you know, gallons of spray were needed. The electrostatics for years, I heard the story not just from you about that, that people have been asking for them and they're not, maybe they weren't able to get them and now you need them and you can't get them.

Ken Wertz  
There was one used one on eBay, normally cost 650 bucks. I think the last time I saw the bid, it was up to close to three grand for a used one. So that's nice. You can get it there. You guys can't see all the people driving behind you looking at us like what the hell are these guys doing?

Josh Peach  
Oh yeah, there was a carload of people with masks on that look like I thought they were gonna actually rob me was like, strange. It's kind of a strange pull up.

John Marcus  
Here we are in sweet suburban Boston.

Josh Peach  
Yeah, yeah. So how do people get ahold of you, Ken?

Ken Wertz  
You go to our website, it's massfacilities.com, my email address contact information is up there. It's exec@massfacilities.com. We've got some really good tools up there. Every time I get something new from CDC, every time I get something new from our state, we're posting it to the website, posting it up there. We're trying to get our information from the source versus trying to just latch on to some of the misinformation that's out there. And even though I'm Massachusetts base, and even if you're not a member, it takes a village. So if you have a question, you have a query, give me a call, give me a holler. I'm happy to see if I can help out in any way that I can. I have plenty of time at home now, so I have an opportunity to have some screen time to try and help out the larger community.

Josh Peach  
Absolutely put it to work well. Really appreciate your time. John, really appreciate your time. Looking over at you here, and you know, and I would say it's Stoughton public schools. You guys have a pretty good Twitter presence as well as you as the superintendent that if an institution--education, non education-- wants to see how to leverage tools like Twitter and social media, I think you guys are doing a phenomenal job sharing and also providing what Kenny said. It's not just fun, it's hope and love I mean, your staff, your team, and your community really, that's something you really get a sense of. So keep up the phenomenal work. I really appreciate you guys taking the time to socially distance meet me here in the parking lot. And hopefully this, hopefully, this is something that folks enjoyed, and maybe get a few minutes to themselves and visualize what we're doing here and the efforts that are being tried to try to make so.

John Marcus  
Thank you. Well, thank you for putting this together. I think it's great. And I think, as you say, the idea that we're all in this together and therefore the communication piece and reaching out to each other and listening to what other folks are doing and taking good ideas is huge. And I'm never with either one of you guys where I don't get a new idea and say, Oh yeah, let me go share with my people. So I think the more that people can reach out and see what others are doing, I think the better. Folks are absolutely welcome to check out our website, we've got tons of learning opportunities for kids all over the place, K -12, pre K to 12. And we're happy to share anything we've developed with anybody throughout the country. So come on over.

Josh Peach  
Awesome. Well, thanks guys. That'll do it from here. You stay safe, keep up the great work and I really appreciate you guys being part of my village and helping the way that you do. Keep it up and always here. 

Ken Wertz  
Thanks, guys. 

Josh Peach  
Thanks for listening to the Operate Intelligently Podcast produced by Dude Solutions. You can reach us by emailing dspodcast@dudesolutions.com or check us out on the web at dudesolutions.com

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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