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Hear from Mayor Tom Henry

We have a great chat with Mayor Tom Henry from the City of Fort Wayne, Indiana who talks about his journey into local government, his 20-year run on the Fort Wayne Council and his current 3rd term as Mayor of the City. Mayor Henry shares some tremendous stories about the city and its growth, as well as him learning from other mayors across the state and the many challenges they face as a fast-growing city.

Mayor Tom Henry's Biography (https://www.cityoffortwayne.org/meet-the-mayor.html)

Show Script

Tom
That's what I would suggest to anybody running for Mayor, whether it's a smaller city or large one is to be prepared to work day and night on creating positive working relationships, because you're going to need them as you try to move your community along.

Brian
Welcome to another episode of the Gov Gab podcast. I'm your host Brian Ondrako. Thanks for being along on this episode. And excited to introduce our guest for today, the Mayor of Fort Wayne, Indiana, Tom Henry. Mayor Henry is serving his third term as the mayor of Fort Wayne. And prior to that, he actually held a seat the City Council for 20 years, from 1983 to 2003. So he's got a tremendous amount of experience and insight that he shares throughout this episode in a very thorough manner. I really appreciate a lot of his answers, and how he talked through not only the, you know, past and present, but also the future and some of the challenges that they expect in the city and how they're kind of trying to overcome them, or at least be thoughtful about them going forward. So we really have a great dialogue throughout. I really enjoyed Mayor Henry being on the episode and excited for him to share his story with everyone. So without further ado, let's jump in my chat today with Mayor Tom Henry. 

Mayor Henry, welcome to the podcast. Thanks for joining this morning.

Tom
My pleasure. Thank you.

Brian
So excited to chat with you. You know, I've talked to a lot of folks in the state, you know, and around different initiatives and stuff. So I was really excited to get a chance to speak with you, obviously one of the largest cities in the state, and figure out what you guys are doing there. And more importantly, I'm always curious about how you got involved in in the local government and those type of things. So maybe that's a good place for us to start. If you don't mind, I'd love to if you could take us back. More because I know you're on the council for a little while. And we'll get into that for you became mayor, what was the first initial thing and maybe it was back when you were really young? Why did you want to get involved in the community? What was inside you will kind of they just, you know, spark that. I guess we'll start there.

Tom
Well, when I was younger, my father was a precinct committeeman. He was a ward chairman. So I was exposed a little bit to the political arena as he worked for a number of different candidates through the years. And sometimes he would have me go out and walk with him and hang door hangers and that type of thing. So I had a little bit of an introduction to the to the whole political campaign atmosphere as I would as I was growing up. But I really got serious, when, back in 1982, we had a pretty severe flood in Fort Wayne, we happen to have three rivers that converge downtown. And all three of them went over their banks during a very heavy rain event. And I was I was a Red Cross volunteer as a kind of a mission of mine to try to help out the community in various ways. And again, one of them was to be a Red Cross volunteer, and I got activated to go to a certain part of town to help evacuate people and put them into shelters in the light. And during that several day period, I became aware that I that I did not think that the section of time that I was representing was getting its fair share of help from the city. Now unbeknownst to me at that time, our whole city was underwater, but I was I was more concerned about my little sector. And I wanted more help for the constituents in the area, if you will, as far as additional food and, and first aid supplies and so on. So I went down to City Hall, try to get them to give us more. And of course, the explanation that I that I received from them was they were doing all of their all that they could.

And I again, I did not think it was sufficient. So I decided to take on the city councilman in that area to be put in a position where, by gosh, in the future, that part of town would get his fair share. And again, realizing now that the mayor and his administration have their hands full in the you know, throughout the entire city. But again, at that time, I wanted my my little part of our city taken care of so I I ran for city council in 1983. And I and I want and that's that was the beginning and I served on City Council 20 years.

Brian
Can you talk about some of those experiences on the City Council then kind of what obviously, because I'll be curious, obviously, as a mayor, all the things you've been involved with, but as a council, maybe sometimes they don't get the love as much sometimes from the citizen. So tell me a little about that experience, obviously, 20 years on that. I'm assuming you had to get re-elected several times. 

Tom
Correct. Right. Yeah, we serve a four-year term. And what I think what appealed to me most about the City Council position once I got in and again, when I want I had no idea really what what I was getting into. I ran because I was upset with the city as far as my interpretation of what the what the city was doing as far as sharing resources to the entire community. And I just wanted our fair share for my section of town. But once I got into City Council, or on City Council, I realized that really a City Councilman, his job was kind of threefold, if you will. One was to be a citizens advocate I had at that time about 20 neighborhoods in the district. And my job was to meet with Neighborhood Association presidents and the other officers was to go to as many neighborhood association meetings as my schedule would allow to actually pull a lot of those association presidents together and form kind a partnership, if you will, between all of them, because sometimes needs would overlap into joining neighborhoods. But the whole job was to my job was to try to make sure that the needs and the wants and the desires of the neighborhoods were met. And most the time that dealt with infrastructure needs, whether it was streets and roads and curbs and sidewalks or in some cases, some utility needs, you know, water and sewer and they're like and traffic control and that type of thing. But that was one part of my job I that identified a second part, which legislative to make sure that the city statutes continue to be appropriate for our city, did they need in some cases to be eliminated that they need to be tweaked? Or do we need to add new ones. So I made it a point of studying our code of statutes in the city and working with other city council members to determine whether we should change certain city statutes and the light. And then the third one was budgetary. We had a city budget at that time, probably in the in the vicinity of 100 million or so. And, you know, the mayor would prepare a budget send it down to us. And then we had roughly two months to go over the budget and determine whether or not it was appropriate. We're not allowed by state statute to increase the budget. But we certainly were allowed to decrease it. And in several instances, we did. But those were the Those were the three areas of responsibility that I identified. And I thought I worked very hard at trying to make sure that those areas were being addressed. 

And it was an extremely enjoyable time of my life. There's no question that public service is something that quite frankly, can be addictive. But the more I was able to do for my neighbors and for those in my district, the more I wanted to do so it's it's no wonder that a lot of people who get involved in politics want to stay.

Brian
So the transition from Councilmember to Mayor talk about that transition because you got stopped. Why did you decide?

Tom
Well, actually, I was running for a sixth term on city council because again, I enjoyed it immensely. Well, I got beat.

We had gone through some massive annexation in our city under a Republican Mayor and I happened to be a Democrat. But we have a Republican Mayor in whose legacy he wanted to is what do you want his legacy to be that he enlarged our city both in land mass and in population? And that's exactly what he did. He had a supportive city council and he did significant annexation. Well, at the same time, the year 2000 had passed and under dictate we had to take a look at redistricting in order to appropriately represented the various districts of the city as far as population. Well, the republicans controlled Council and right or wrong they, they brought in a number of new neighborhoods that were predominantly Republican and moved a lot of my heavily Democratic neighborhoods into other districts. And I ended up losing my district by about 100 votes. So I lost and but that was okay. Obviously I was somewhat depressed because I had worked very hard, but in the political arena when you do redistricting, and in some cases, that could be interpreted gerrymandering, but that is what it is. They they moved the districts around, and I ended up getting beat. But so I accepted that begrudgingly.

But I accepted them for four years, I was fine. I had a business, and I went back into the private sector. But what happened the following municipal election period, though, was the Mayor at that time, who was to term Democratic Mayor opted not to run for a third term. And he appeared to have waited to kind of the 11th hour. So the Democrats had an extremely difficult time trying to recruit somebody to be their candidate for Mayor. And they asked me on a couple of different occasions, and I declined, because I was used to the legislative branch and really didn't have any desire to move to the executive branch. But they stayed on me, they even recruited my wife to support their plea, which obviously made a significant difference in my thinking pattern. But in others as well. Finally, I took a look at who was going to be their Republican candidate, and felt that I could do as good a job. It's not better than him. So I ended up running. And in November of that year, I won.

Brian
Was there one thing, when you started out was there, I don't know one thing that you're kind of nervous about kind of running for the office, that maybe it's been confirmed, or maybe it's been debunked, that you shouldn't have been worried about in the first place, anything you could share, I'm kind of in that time to transition and running for Mayor?

Tom
I think probably that the biggest concern of mine was that I didn't know anybody. Outside at the local level, I knew what the City Council members and I knew some of the businessmen and women, but I realized very quickly that a municipality, especially the size of Fort Wayne, had to communicate constantly with legislators at the state level, the governor's office, a lot of the state departments, in some cases, federal legislators and departments in Washington, and I had absolutely no experience in that, nor did I know anybody in that was that was that put me in a rather stressful situation. Because again, in order to keep a city this size moving, you had to be able to, to communicate and sway, in some cases, decisions at the state and federal level, to do what's best for your community. And I had to be a real quick study and do a lot of traveling my first couple of years as mayor, to go to Indianapolis, and to go to DC and meet with all these people and try to create some type of working relationship. So that was pretty overwhelming initially. And I, at the time that I was running, I didn't really take that into consideration. I was thinking more at the local level and not what it was going to take at a state and federal level.

Brian
Is that probably, and maybe it's something different, but like the biggest, unspoken challenge that folks don't even realize, you know, for running Mayor or taking the position? Is there anything you could share with me what you just said? Or would it be anything different you'd add to that?

Tom
Well, I don't think there's any question that, that your ability to network throughout the community, and I had, I've been at Fort Wayne almost all my life. And again, I was on City Council, you know, for a number of years. So a lot of the local contacts I had already made. Either I knew them again, professionally or personally. Our family is quite large. So I was able to meet a lot of the business, men and women already so locally, it wasn't, it wasn't terribly challenging. But trying to make the contacts and set up a positive working relationship at the state and federal level was daunting. And initially, and I but I think that's what I would suggest to anybody running for mayor, whether it's a smaller city or a large one is to be prepared to work day and night on creating positive working relationships, because you're going to need them as you try to move your community along.

Brian
How do you go about juggling the full-time job because obviously, you've been a successful businessman look like at least from some of the research I did. And obviously being Mayor and even on the council for many years, is there anything you did from a time management or habit standpoint, that kind of helps you stay organized, and all those different things?

Tom
You use that wisely when you said time management. Again, it doesn't really make any difference in many cases, the size of your community, every Mayor that I've met, whether it's a smaller community or a large city, all of us take our jobs very seriously. And anytime you're talking about day and night.

And you really do need to plan your time. Very carefully. I, I have a couple of demands, if you will, for lack of a better word, to my staff. You know, I don't, I don't have any meetings before seven o'clock in the morning, from seven o'clock on, meet. But I know a lot of people like to start their days at 5 am and 5:30 am. I, I did that I don't want to do that anymore. I'm getting too old to do that. So any meetings, I don't meet before 7 am. And they're pretty good at scheduling meetings after that. Also, I require one weekend off a month to be with my family. So no cutting ribbons, no parades.

Nothing like that one weekend. And outside of that. I'll be glad to you know, kick off 5K runs or whatever. But my two requirements of my my schedulers is no meetings before 7 am. And I want one weekend off a month to be with my family. But outside of that. Now, I do get calls, day and night. At night. It's normally public safety calls. If there's an unfortunately a crime situation that the police chief wants me to be aware of, or a several alarm fire that the fire chief thinks I need to be notified of. And they do that because media normally calls me when something like this breaks, and you'd like to have an opinion. Well, the police and fire chief want to make sure that I get it from them directly before it's released to the general public or before media calls. But time management, as you said a few minutes ago, that's that's probably the most important.

Or one of the most important items that a mayor needs to consider. Otherwise, you'll burn yourself out. If you work day and night and go take any weekends off and don't take any vacation, you will burn out. I've seen it happen. I've that's one of the reasons why I put some restrictions on my time because you've got to have some downtime. So I'm pretty I'm pretty careful with that.

Brian
What's been your favorite part of the job of Mayor?

Tom
Well, if you allow me, there's probably two things. One is to be in a position where you can affect the life of your city. And you can in a positive fashion, you know, there's been some decisions that I've been able to make that you know, have come to fruition that I'm very proud of. And to be able to be in a position to affect that kind of change to not only perhaps make life better for your current citizen base, but in some cases, it will be there for generations to come and what a What a wonderful position to be in a position of trust that citizens give you in order to make those kind of decisions. So that, obviously is something that that humbles me, but at the same time, is it it's exciting to be in that kind of position. But the second thing that I really enjoy, and I know this may sound somewhat Pollyannaish if you will. But it's true. I love meeting with school children, particularly Elementary School.

Number one, it's because they don't have an agenda other than an innocent curiosity. You know, many times I meet with, with businessmen and women or with other groups. And I know going into that meeting, that they have an agenda, whether it's, it's stated beforehand, or it's a hidden agenda that comes out during the meeting. I know that they know that. And it's a matter sometimes if just sitting down trying to figure out what the true agenda is. And it's it's tiring, but it's necessary in this business. But when I meet with school children, and I'll take that up to middle school, high schoolers are a little bit different. Most High schoolers and I meet with it, I'm speaking to the government class, and it's a little more academic. But elementary school children are absolutely wonderful to meet with. You know, they want to know, things like, whether or not I have a bodyguard, or do I do I have a limousine? Do I live in a house like the White House?

You know, have I ever have I ever really met Santa Claus? You know, those kinds of questions. And again, I know they're very simplistic in nature. But it's very refreshing. It's almost a respite, period for me, because they absolutely love the fact that someone who they consider to be president of the city, not mayor, but President is taking the time to be with them. Sometimes I read books to them, sometimes we sing. But Brian, it's it is a it's a period of being mayor, that is so refreshing, because it's so innocent. So those two things are really make my job worthwhile.

Brian
And you mentioned some of the decisions early, you're proud of any one or two that you'd share in more specific?

Well, I think there's two things that have really had an effect on our community that so far has, has really helped contribute to, particularly our downtown being a catalyst for additional development. In our community, one is leaving or not, because the bridge that we built on a on a one way Avenue coming into downtown. We named it the Martin Luther King Memorial Bridge. And it's an absolutely beautiful bridge, architecturally, but also we set it up so we can light it at night, different colors, we actually have, believe it or not 1 million different variations of lights that we can do not only colors, but different schemes. And it's really neat to be able to on a keyboard to be able to play with the various possibilities, and many times will light it up. For instance, on St. Patrick's Day, you know, will have been green for a couple of days. And the Fourth of July, obviously is red, white and blue for a few days. And Brian, if you, you know got hold of me and there was an open day and you wanted it to be your college colors. And again, if no one had taken that particular day, there's no reason we can't do that for you. So we honor people's anniversaries of school colors. And I can go on and on. But as a wonderful addition to our town as far as something that's very creative and innovative and quiet in the crack the bridge as you come into our downtown. So that's where, and that's the decision they made very early in my Mayor term, my first term. And that turned out real nice, I was really proud of that. And again, it's still talked about even though it's been up now for about nine or 10 years.

The second I want to say accomplishment that we were able to put together for downtown, we have a huge several block development where our baseball stadium is now the baseball stadium was actually in the process of being put together when I became Mayor. So really the credit for our minor league baseball stadium should go to my predecessor, and it is a we've won numbers of awards for the best minor league baseball stadium in the country. We've won that several times. It is a gorgeous facility. But what we decided to do, though, was to continue to develop much all around the stadium. So attached to the stadium, we have a multi-floor parking garage to not only meet the needs of the stadium, but there were a number of businesses in the area that were being stretched as far as parking spaces for their respective employees. So this was going to take care of that too. And then next to the parking garage, we had received a number of requests from our convention center for more hotel space. So we built a hotel, we were able to negotiate that with the Marriott. So we built an additional hotel, which again, not only improved that area, but nothing needs of our convention center. So now they can get bigger conventions. But we also needed to have some additional reasons for people to visit the stadium other than a baseball game. So we built on the fourth side of the of the several block area, the multi use facility that now has hospitality and retail offerings on their first floor, and then a couple of floors of offices and then the top two or three floors, or apartments overlooking the city and on one side and the baseball stadium on the other. So you can sit up there and watch a baseball game and it won't cost you $10. But anyway, so it's not a four-sided development. But it has just really served as a, again as a catalyst for significant amount of additional development downtown, from recreational to hospitality to housing. So those are the two that really stand out. As far as my first few years in office.

Brian
Is there a kind of on the other side of the coin there, you know, challenges that the city faces, obviously is a large city, there's a lot going on, anything that you guys are anticipating maybe it's a big challenge, something you're dealing with now, or maybe the next few years that you're trying to take measures to prepare for?

Tom
Brian, probably one big concern we have now is the opioid challenge. Not unlike a lot of my colleagues and other communities, we're all facing different levels, and different strains when it comes to the drug situation in our respective communities. And we have seen a significant increase in opioid abuse and the ramifications of that in our community.

And we're trying to get our head around it. We've we've had several seminars for public safety individuals, we've had educational offerings or social service networks were meeting with our educational facility. So we're trying to take a look at you know, what, what not only perhaps is the cause of some of this, but also how do we again, get our get our arms around not only the enforcement, but the education and treatment, as it relates to the increasing drug problem in our community. That's probably the biggest challenge that I have. Right now we're trying to address it again, from a multi-faceted perspective. I don't think there's a silver bullet, I think it's you're going to have to win the fight your your, again, your faith-based community or social service network. Educational, we bring we brought the stadium for monies to help us develop additional treatment centers. Again, I think we're we're aggressively pursuing it. And I think that we're going to be able to address a lot of it. But unfortunately, I don't see a quick end in sight. It took several decades for the realization that opioids were a problem. And I think it's going to be a while before we're able to put ourselves in a position where we think we have complete control.

That's my current biggest challenge. But I think looking at the years to come, I think probably access to capital was probably going to be one of the biggest challenges that we have, we're, we're blessed right now in Fort Wayne to, to have a little bit of money, we have a pretty healthy cash balance. And we have a tax base that supplies us sufficient revenue to support a lot of the programs and services that we have. But as the economy begins to turn, I think we're overall our local economy is very good word about three and a half percent unemployment, which we're interpreting is pretty much full employment. 

So we're in pretty good shape there, we still need to work to create some kind of synergy between our educators and our employers to make sure that we're positioning ourselves with the right jobs for the future. But as our state and nation, the economy turns and, you know, what will eventually we've been on a tremendous positive rise for the last? I don't know, Brian, what would you say 10 years or so. It's, it's been pretty good. But everything is cyclical. And as a, as a form of businessman, as a mayor, we know we get economic indicators. And again, I think we're going to be okay for a while, but eventually it will turn and when it does, we've got to be very careful of our revenue streams to make sure that they can continue to support so I think access to capital is going to be a challenge in the future.

Brian
Yeah, one of the things I want to mention to you. And I always like to hear perspective, from you mentioned, kind of, you know, some of your other peers that are kind of going through similar things with the opioid epidemic and stuff like that, and I do you get a chance to, and I almost fail if I fail to ask about Mayor Pete running for Mayor. And I was just thought about that. But you can take that if you want it. But I'm curious your thoughts just on working with your peers and how you guys get involved, maybe learning what they're doing or learning what not to do before you actually get involved with them. Just kind of curious your thoughts and some of that peer to peer relationship with guys in the city.

Tom
Brian, it's imperative. It's not I'm concerned that mayors meet from time to time. In fact, I would take that down to our legislative bodies to that they should meet from time to time I did not, I was not provided the opportunity to do much of that when I was on City Council. But obviously things have changed considerably since then. But I do meet with my fellow mayors. We have meetings every month. For those that can attend. We also have I'm on board of directors of our state association and I have a chance to meet with mayors some all over the state, normally we just meet from our different parts of the state I happened or Fort Wayne happens to be in the North East section of our state. So we mayors meet, because some problems are some challenges are, you know, specifically to our part of the state. But we do meet with all of the mayor's from time to time every other month.

Reason I say it's imperative is because sometimes the challenges that might come up in your community may have already been addressed by another community. And some of them have already developed best practices that could definitely apply to your community. So it really can ultimately save a lot of time, a lot of effort, a lot of money, if someone else has already gone through a particular challenge, and they can share with you how they addressed it. And it might be applicable to your city. And then also we brainstorm about new opportunities that we have read about or heard about and other parts of the country that might be something that, you know, could serve our state well. So it's good for brainstorming is good for pop identification and solution, identification, education in general, soon, there's a lot. There's a lot of advantages of sitting in with your peers and being able to spend some time with each other. And we also have some social time to I don't want to forget to say that.

Brian
I have to ask did you. I mean, with having Mayor Pete run has that given more notice on the state? Has that helped? I'm curious with is it more media involved on that would be curious, your thoughts? Or if it hasn't affected you guys at all?

Tom
Oh, yeah. There's no question that Mayor Pete has brought Indiana a little bit more to the, to the forefront of national discussions. You know, Indiana, been in the Midwest and kind of tucked in between Ohio and Illinois. And below Michigan, many times, it's overlooked, because we don't have some of the largest cities like Chicago or like a Detroit.

So it's not unusual for believe it or not, for some people in this country. Not to know where Indiana is. And that's unfortunate. But, you know, as they say it is what it is. But with Mayor Pete running, not only is he bringing some identification to the state of Indiana, but he's also putting South Bend, Indiana on the map. Now, last time I saw Pete I complained because Fort Wayne is is over twice the size of South Bend and he's getting all of the attention. Then he just bluntly told me well if maybe you should run for president and it's not like, but no, Pete is a is a great guy. He's extremely intelligent, very articulate. I don't know whether it's going to be successful ultimately, in his run for president, but I think he is definitely a breath of fresh air as far as some new and up and coming statesman, wanting to represent the country. So I'm very impressed with his question.

Brian
So let's end on this. I'm curious your thought and if you could take it on two roads. First is I would like to kind of advice that you have you've been doing this for a long time have a lot of kind of wisdom, from all these different roles you've been in through the local government. One any advice to your fellow mayors or other councilmen or throughout the country?

Or on the other side of the coin? Citizens, people that want to get involved, you know, any advice to them on getting involved or maybe we should stop making excuses to not get involved, maybe take it that way. But I'm curious, any advice to end the the interview on that you'd like to share?

Tom
Well, I think every city and quite frankly, every citizen really needs to do an assessment of what their city really needs to address as far as components to make their their city a success. And I'll give an example. My cabinet and I we said we've identified six areas that we need to really stay on top of one is public safety. So we make sure that we have an adequate police force. In our case, it's about 480 police officers, and a well functioning Fire Department make sure that we have the equipment and the training to make sure that, Brian, if you live in Fort Wayne, when you go to bed at night, that you've got a comfortable feeling that you're being taken care of out on the screen. So public safety is something we've identified is very important to us. Obviously, development, as I mentioned, worried about a three and a half percent unemployment. But with that brings some additional challenges because quite frankly, we have, in many cases, more jobs than we have qualified people. So we're in the process now of trying to create a partnership between our educators and our employers to make sure that the that the curriculums that the our educators put together that the degree offerings and the like, are in areas that are going to have jobs available for these graduates when they do complete their degrees. So we bring those two together to make sure that we have got the foundation for continuation of you know, good paying jobs in our community. We'd like another areas is infrastructure. You know, just as much as our diamond towns are kind of the, the heart of our cities. The neighborhoods are certainly the backbone, if you will.

Employers may like our downtowns. But if we don't have neighborhoods with good housing, stock and good streets, and roads and curves, and sidewalks and ADA ramps and the like, well, where their employees supposed to move, I can't give the employer substantial financial incentives, without making sure that when they move employees to our community that we have nice, adequate neighborhoods for them to live. And so our infrastructure is, is something that we work on. As I mentioned, our downtown, we've invested heavily in our downtown because we think that that helps make our cities or our city have a point of destination, so that you've got good entertainment and hospitality offerings. And that threw down my downtown is thriving and alive.

Our park system, we take a look at that. And we have a number of parks in our community. And our citizens love our parks, we have a zoo and we have a number of other offerings in the park system that our citizens want and deserve. So we spend, you know, a lot of time in our in our, in our park system. And then finally, our city utilities, we happen to own our own city utilities. So the water and sewer programs are our responsibility, we want to make sure that our citizens have good clean water, and a good sewer system. So Brian, those are the six areas that we've identified as areas that our citizens are looking to us to provide for them in a way that makes them proud to live here. And I would suggest that every city kind of do an inventory of the needs and wants of their citizens and put together gather a strategic plan to make sure that those that those needs are met.

And then down the second row, though, something a little more altruistic, if you will. I asked my staff to do four things. And I stole these from the West Point Army Academy.

They have a maxim that serves that Academy and again, I stole it and I kind of use it as the maximum for my staff. And if you allow me, this simply says to care more than others think is wise. to risk more than others think is safe. to expect more than others think as possible. And to dream more than others think is practical.

That's what I asked my staff to do. And you know, it's served us well.

Brian
Now that's really great. And yeah, that's a good that's a good way to end on some good advice there to to kind of share out for for everyone listening. So Mayor Henry, this has been really fun. I appreciate you coming on and sharing your story and a lot of things going on in Fort Wayne there and and good luck to you. Hope to keep in touch.

Tom
Brian, thanks so much. Feel free to call me anytime.

Brian
Hey, everyone. Just one more quick thing before you run along on your day, please head over to iTunes, leave us a quick review. Give us a rating. Let us know how we're doing so we can make this podcast better each and every episode. And really put out a good product here for you guys to listen in and learn a little bit more about your local communities and some of the folks that are running them. We certainly appreciate you sticking in listening through these and providing that feedback and hope you guys will join on the next episode. Take care and have a phenomenal day.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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