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Hear from Campus Business Manager David Marcus

Hear what David Marcus, Campus Business Manager for de Toledo High School, has to say about a proactive approach to crisis management during this Dude University interview. He also shares what he’s looking forward to next in operations management.  

Show Notes:

Show Script:

Brian  
Welcome to the Operate Intelligently Podcast, the podcast for all things operations. We're here at Dude University with another interview. Today, we have David Marcus, who is the campus business manager at de Toledo High School. Dave, welcome to the podcast.

David Marcus  
Thank you very much. It's a pleasure to be here. And really awesome actually to be at Dude U. You know there's something really exciting about being here. This is, I think, my six or so Dude U and it's great to be back.

Brian  
Well we are glad you were able to make it and join us. So tell us a little bit about you know your role and what you do. 

David Marcus  
I'm called the campus business manager, but essentially I'm the director of facilities. And I'm responsible for the maintenance and the construction work, rentals, and the security of our campus. We're a nine through 12 high school, we're faith-based we're a Jewish school. And we've got about 400 students. And we do a bang up job of rentals. And we're open about 360 days a year, between school and rentals and other activities.

Brian  
And you actually spoke today, could you tell us a little bit about the session that you spoke about?

David Marcus  
My session today was on crisis management. And it's something that is in everyone's minds. It certainly is in the minds of many people in different schools across the nation. Just recently, Charlotte had a very tragic incident, which is very close to home here. Not that long ago, very close to home to us in San Diego. There was a synagogue in Poway, where someone was murdered. And even six months ago, there was a synagogue where I believe 18 or so people were murdered. There are other school incidents in between and crisis management really is something that we all need to take, be aware of and do something about and be proactive as opposed to reactive. It's really easy to be reactive. It's much less expensive and much simpler. But if we take a proactive stance, that makes it easier if the incident either happens directly to us, or somewhere around us or someone that we know about.

Brian  
Yeah, I agree. I think, you know, we've talked a lot about emergency preparedness on the podcast, and I think crisis management, falls kind of in that same category. And, you know, when something does happen, you don't have time to kind of figure it out and put a plan together. And that's why, you know, crisis/emergency management planning is so important, because then you've kind of got that playbook to go to, you know, who to call, who's in charge, kind of how to handle the different entities that you have to deal with.

David Marcus  
Right, and actually, one of the takeaways that I want people to really have when we leave the session is that you drill and you train, and you drill and you train, and you do more of it. And it's unfortunate that we have to do it. And from an educational standpoint, there's always kickback from the teachers and from the principal saying, we're here to educate our kids, we don't have time for this. But my comeback is, we need to have a safe environment. If we don't have a safe environment, we can't educate. And so to do that, we've got to do drills, unfortunately, at least on a monthly basis. Different schools, different situations will vary, but it's really important.

Brian  
So, you were able to use your school as kind of a case study almost and a blueprint for others to learn from.

David Marcus  
Without telling everyone all of our security secrets. Yeah, absolutely.

Brian  
Yeah. More from a process and preparations.

David Marcus  
Right. Absolutely. Yeah.

Brian  
That's great. That's great. So what do you see is like, really exciting trends coming up within operations and operations management.

David Marcus  
Going backwards, it was like 20 years ago, I remember getting my first cell phone, and it was this brick, the size of a brick. And now it's less than the size of my palm and much, much thinner. And I think that automation is a big thing for what's going to be happening in the next 20 years. The type of automation, I can't fully tell you, I'm not technically inclined in those areas. But when we're looking at 3D and all kinds of interesting items to make people's jobs quicker and easier. The only thing that is partially unfortunate about it is people lose some jobs when we have too much automation, but I knew what the Dude is doing is going to be some great advantages for schools and making them more productive and more cost effective. And really, we want kids to go to our schools. We want to have better schools. And to do that we do need money and some of the items that Dude comes across makes it much more easier so that we can afford different items. 

Brian  
You know, and that's interesting point you make about, you know, automation and we see it in any industry, not just operations and maintenance. But I think one of the best things I've heard sometimes from our clients is how it helps them justify keeping their technicians. Say prior, they had a hard time making that justification and having the data and being able to report on it easily. And now they're able to go back and say, I need these guys. Here's the volume of workload they have. If we don't, then we will create a much worse backlog and other things can happen.

David Marcus  
Absolutely. And that's something that I've shared with our leadership. They asked why we need a building engineer for example, and that's not a cheap position-- it's an expensive position. But when you take a look at the cost to have someone from offside, come on to fix an air conditioning or electrician or a plumber. It just right there, the cost effect is out of it. And then you've got the customer service. When you're going to call the chances are, they're not going to be there till the next day. Yeah, and if you've got an onsite person, customer service is so so important for any and every school, and to fix something as soon as possible. And you're not going to have everything fixed by that person and for either time or expertise, but at least you've got a great start. And it's a good reason to have a good, clean maintenance staff on hand when possible.

Brian  
And also, you know, I'm assuming they're more familiar with the equipment, they're familiar with the buildings, they're familiar with all the different things. Where if it's somebody coming in off site, it takes them a while to get, you know, acclimated to the different things they may not know, you know, where your inventory is, or whatever and have to keep coming back and asking you certain questions.

David Marcus  
Absolutely. That's something worth money in itself. You've got someone who knows the equipment, how it's been handling the problems, it's had, or has not had, what's new, not new, how to get to the different places of the campus the quickest. All of those are valuable assets that go into the picture. And usually having someone on staff is much, much more valuable. You can't even count in dollars and cents the value. Hopefully you've got some wise people who see that.

Brian  
I want to thank David for coming and sharing his experiences here at Dude University. David, thank you.

David Marcus  
My pleasure. Thank you very much.

Brian  
Thank you for listening to the Operate Intelligently Podcast produced by Dude Solutions. You can reach us by emailing dspodcast@dude solutions.com or check us out on the web at dudesolutions.com

Transcribed by https://otter.ai
 

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